Tag Archive | "ID checking"

I can’t be trusted to get to the Gents and back without an escort


Remember me talking about Cerberus, some while ago? Not the three-headed guardian of the underworld, but the new e-forms system that the Defence Vetting Authority launched with great fanfare – well, great fanfare in the world of security clearance, anyway, o actually it was quite understated – to speed up the whole clearance process.

Guess what. It hasn’t actually worked as advertised. Quelle surprise…

121 days ago I clicked “Submit” on my electronic Cerberus application form, having recently started at the current gig for a client that requires genuine clearance. Ever since I’ve been logging on to the portal to see what’s happening, and have always been presented with the somewhat cryptic message “In progress”. Which means my file is still dragging its way through the labyrinthine machinations of the clearance process. For CTC clearance.

(For those of you unfamiliar with the clearance grades, there are basically four levels: BPSS, meaning “You are who you say you are”, CTC, meaning “We know you are who you say you are”, SC, meaning “We really do know you are”, and DV, which means “Not only do we know who you are, but we know who your friends are as well”.)

So CTC is not exactly the most difficult thing in the world to check for. In fact the DVA’s own service level states that they will process 85% of CTC applications in 30 days. So, one might assume, something has gone a little astray. However, I can’t check that since, despite my having access to the Portal to see where I’m up to, I can’t actually ask any questions, that has to come from the sponsor. So that doesn’t really help. Nor does the interesting statistic that DVA are processing 250,000 clearance requests a year. Which seems rather a lot.

So what does this actually mean? Now there’s an interesting question.

The client’s own rules say that I can’t have a building pass without clearance. So I can’t get past the front desk in the morning without an escort, my laptop bag (and carrier bag of Waitrose sandwiches) have to go through the scanner, I can’t get to the coffee shop by myself, I can’t visit the Gents and I can’t get out at the end of the day. I certainly can’t wander down the corridor to talk to my various colleagues about assorted problems, which, given I do Service Design and have to understand the end-to-end details of things, is something of a limitation.

Bizarrely, what I can do is read and review a host of technical information about the client’s infrastructure. I can talk to their staff about requirements, including discussions on access rights to services. In short, I can see all the information that clearance is intended to protect. Which, to be fair, is in the rules; someone has done a risk assessment and decided I can be trusted with that information. Which I can; after all I’ve held high level clearance before, several times.

And I’m not the only one. Until very recently one of our Technical Design people had the same problem, and he gets a lot closer to the detail than I ever need to.

So a bit of a disconnect in the process them. Basically I can do everything I need to do and read anything I need to read but I can’t be trusted to get to the Gents and back without an escort. And I’m getting just a bit too old to want people to hold my hand while I do so.

But don’t get me wrong. I take this security clearance issue very seriously indeed. I’ve been closely involved in getting the rules clarified and applied properly for several years. The rules are totally realistic and justifiable and offer a degree of protection that I fully support. But someone somewhere in the client’s security management team really needs to lift their head from JSP440 and apply just a little common sense. Don’t they?

About the author: Alan Watts

Alan has worked in IT for most of the last 35 years, and first went freelance in 1996. He has been a PCG member from its start and has been spreading the message that freelancing is a professional career choice for many years. Alan also runs Malvolio’s Blog, a personal but highly informative take on the life of the modern freelance.

Alan Watts, Principal Consultant, LPW Computer Services

© 2011 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

Image: Unhappy greek toilet by dan taylor

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The three headed dog from hell or a huge step in the right direction?


I don’t know if anyone’s noticed, but there’s a bit of a revolution going on this weekend. Something I’ve been banging on about since early 2003 is facing a big and, to my eyes, rather significant change. And I bet 90% of the people it affects don’t even know about it.

It’s called Cerberus. OK, that’s a three headed dog from hell to some, but to others it’s a huge step change.

Cerberus is primarily a Case Management System to look after the security clearance of anyone who holds it or are put up for clearance in order to get work in any of the myriad HMG-sponsored roles that demand it. It’s aim is to simplify and standardise what is currently a fairly creaky and almost totally paper-based system.

I’ve spoken before (at great length, some may say…) about the Catch-22 of no clearance means no job but you can’t have the clearance without the job. This is especially true of contractors, who have to be able to take up new roles on fairly short order; permanent staff are usually (but not always) in a position to stay with the old job or otherwise sit around until they are allowed to start the new one. So contractors like me are the real victims of this situation to the extent that I was not allowed to apply for a role a while back to implement a system I’d designed while I was cleared, since my clearance had lapsed in the interim.

The reason for this is the blind insistence from many agencies and more than a few prime contractors is that clearance takes forever to come through and without it you can’t work. And since the rules are that you can apply for clearance without a sponsor, the net effect is the aforementioned Catch-22, and the jobs on offer go to the same old circle of those inside the fence.

But this is wrong on several counts.

Firstly the main clearance agencies have been working to get their existing systems much more efficient. DVA, who look after the MOD, routinely clear 95% of SC clearances in less than 30 days and can fast track them in as little as 10. Again using me as the example, I was cleared by one of the constabularies to the same level in two weeks flat. So time is not really an issue.

Secondly you don’t need clearance to start the job, most of the time. The basic level of BPSS is not a million miles away from the kind of ID and residency checks we are routinely asked to do for any role. BPSS allows you to access material marked up to “Restricted”, which is around 90% of it. There are a very few exceptions, where informed supervision can’t be given, and until your full clearance comes through you will have to be collected from the front gate and taken back to it, but that’s hardly a major barrier to overcome.

And finally if you only ever take your workers from the same limited gene pool, how are you ever going to improve? Hoe many projects have failed because of the lack of up-to-date skills and practices I wonder.

Cerberus will bring all the clearance records into a single database, supported by on-line e-forms to replace the paperwork. All the various clearance agencies will have access to it, led by DVA and the Home Office equivalent, which makes everything far more traceable and, more importantly, transferable (my police clearance is not accepted by DVA, even though the police checks are actually slightly more rigorous. Go figure…)

So a big step forward. The target is to get SC clearance down to 15 days and CTC to less than a week. Let’s just hope the agencies notice…

About the author: Alan Watts

Alan has worked in IT for most of the last 35 years, and first went freelance in 1996. He has been a PCG member from its start and has been spreading the message that freelancing is a professional career choice for many years. Alan also runs Malvolio’s Blog, a personal but highly informative take on the life of the modern freelance.

Alan Watts, Principal Consultant, LPW Computer Services

© 2011 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited<

Image: Herlitz Monster-Talent Monster04 by Herlitz-Monster-Deal

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