Categorized | alan's blog

Who said we need to import skills to ensure success…?

Who said we need to import skills to ensure success…?

I was somewhat taken aback this week to read that someone in government had had a fit of the vapours and said something sensible. Even more confusing was that this was from the Labour side of the House. Although, just to restore my faith in human nature, he’s been shouted down by the rest of his side.

This was Lord Glassman, who has said that we need to put a freeze on immigration. Not a cap or a phased reduction, but a total stop, with the sole exception of the small number of skilled people we actually need to encourage to come over.

Of course none of this would be an issue if we had a better history of controlling who’s coming in, but we are where we are. At least we have some much more effective rules in place to bring a bit of sanity to the ICT system these days, which is the bit that really concerns us IT people. And for which, let us not forget, we owe a debt to the work the PCG has been doing over the years.

But as usual, nothing is as it seems.

There’s a bit of a debate going on about the new rules, centring of all stupid things on payable expenses, that well known fiddle factor beloved of the umbrella companies and assorted MPs…

But I digress. The rules set a minimum salary for the ICT candidate. However, with the usual stunning clarity of purpose, they haven’t actually defined how that salary should be made up. So you can include, for example, the costs of bringing your worker over here and giving them somewhere to live while they’re here.

Then we get into the Kafkaesque realms of do we include expenses paid for travel and accommodation while working somewhere else? I mean, let’s just think about that for a moment. You ship someone into the country, pay for their accommodation and give them a living wage. Then they have to go somewhere else on your behalf, for which you are paying the bills (or damned well ought to be). So how can that be part of their gross salary? Because I’m willing to bet that they never see any of it; if they did, their payslips wouldn’t be subject to the same level of secrecy as those nice people at GCHQ.

And just to pile on the ineptitude, the rules are being arranged so that “the taxpayer is not disadvantaged”. Excuse me? Taxpayer? The taxpayer, to the man on the Clapham omnibus, is someone who has a life here, a permanent address, is known to the gentlemen at HMRC. He’s not just popped over to perform a limited engagement (much of which seems to be to learn how to do the job so he can take those skills back home). And since his prime purpose is to take away work that could be done by someone who does live here, I’m afraid I’m not all that minded to be fair in how he gets paid.

Other countries have twigged this. Canada, for one, is taking positive action. How typical of our team that we try to treat them fairly and actively assist them in their efforts, less we tread on someone’s toes.

Talking of treading on toes, let’s give a small Hurrah for the PCG. Actually no, let’s make that a very large one. They have won not one but two trade awards, for electronic communication and membership success, against some much bigger (and older) organisations. Bearing in mind this is a very small team, the impact their work is having where it matters is out of all proportion.

Who said we need to import skills to ensure success…?

About the author: Alan Watts

Alan has worked in IT for most of the last 35 years, and first went freelance in 1996. He has been a PCG member from its start and has been spreading the message that freelancing is a professional career choice for many years. Alan also runs Malvolio’s Blog, a personal but highly informative take on the life of the modern freelance.

Alan Watts, Principal Consultant, LPW Computer Services

© 2011 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited

Image: No entry by Morgaine

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

  • Switch Accountants for FREE

    Switch Accountants for FREEAt K&B Accountancy Group we have introduced a simple and straightforward approach to changing accountants. We’re offering contractors, consultants and freelancers the opportunity to switch to K&B Accountancy Group for FREE without the need to pay for any ‘catch up’ or retrospective accountancy fees for the previous year’s accounts and corporation tax return* *T&Cs apply

our top 5 twitter posts

twitter

contractor accountants

contractoraccts



twitter Join the conversation
Free Telephone Advice